PhD writing, publishing and editing: top articles

Over the course of the year, the Hive Scholars have found and tweeted many helpful articles and blog posts.  We thought it be a great idea to collate some of them in themed blog posts.  Firstly: writing, publishing and editing! After our very informative event with SAGE’s Bronia Flett, we thought we could point you to some other great posts from PhDs, editors and writers.  If you come across anything else then do let us know in our comments!

Writing

There are so many articles out there about academic writing. This lenghty post from Deborah Lupton on the LSE blog (incidentally, a great resource generally for all kinds of articles) contains 30 tips for better academic writing.  This article would probably be the most useful for those starting out, as it breaks down the planning and outlining stages of a PhD as well as thinking about writing, but contains so many tips that it will probably have something for everyone.

Though I’m always nervous about blogs or articles with negative statements in the title, this one by Tara Brabazon contains some easy tips to implement, such as ensuring you state clearly your original contribution to knowledge and checking for your spelling mistakes.

Here at the Hive, we have also posted some writing posts as part of our competitions. The winning post by Natalie Edelman went into great detail about her experiences of writing and what she has found helpful, including a nice cake metaphor! We also had some other tips sent into us from some PhD students, which includes some suggested reading and resources.  I also had a go at writing some of my own advice here.  I used a metaphor too, but not about cakes, mine was more about swimming and the sea…

Publishing

There is definitely more pressure than ever to get your work out there and PhD students are feeling it.  There are lots of posts out there that break down thinking about publishing into different areas, like this one from the Guardian Higher Education Network, which includes tips from many different editors.  This one from PhD Life at Warwick give very useful advice about what to do when your manuscript is accepted with revisions or even out-and-out rejected.

Editing

This article, whilst talking about post-thesis editing, and therefore taking as its basis the idea that your thesis might be rubbish (!), it actually contains some pointers about editing it into a book, as well as general ideas around writing, editing and time management.  Whereas in this article, the argument is framed as revisions rather than editing, meaning that finishing an article is all about drafting and drafting again, rather than assuming that what you write the first time is okay.

Clearly this is by no means an exhaustive list and there are lots more great articles. Hopefully this is enough to keep you going!

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